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in the murdoch scandal. this time the number two man in scotland yard. one day after number one man went belly up. and easy to follow flow chart tonight of the tangled relationships between and among murdoch's people and the police and will ask, is it happening here in america as well? if you've never heard that michele bachmann referred to homosexuality at bondage, despair and enslavement, gay rights groups have and are making sure will you. tonight, anything you say, or certainly anything michele bachmann says, will be used against you in the court of public opinion. let me finish tonight with a great moment for america. even if defeat at the world cup. we start with the republicans as a protest party. david korn and an msnbc political analyst and pat buchanan, a political analyst as well for msnbc. i was watching you on "morning joe." working both ends ever the block. 12 hours after you began your day. never seen a republican democrat party, we have is a position, take it or leave it. we're not dealing at all with you. what do you think of the party platform now. >>> the republican party, the
the scandal seems to be far from over. scotland yard say they have identified 4000 possible hacking victims. an inquiry will start into possible wrongdoing by police officers. we have the latest on that part of the case. >> this famous newspaper titles may have been confined to history, but the scrutiny of its methods goes on. britain's most senior policeman has officers investigating whether other officers were bribed by journalists. >> a small group of officers may have engaged in these practices. i will determine to do what we should do, and that is proceed to criminal courts. >> a former employee told the court last year as a witness that he knew nothing about payments from the police or to the police. e-mails have been provided the raise serious questions. >> someone from news international is misleading us. he has to answer a perjury charge, and that is very serious. >> tonight, it is reported that he will be arrested after setting himself to a police station for questioning. scotland yard says its investigation will be robust, whereas in the past, insiders say it has fallen short. on
, and that company is involved with bribing foreign officials, that being detectives at scotland yard, it's a violation of that act. we most frequently see that act being prosecuted with companies opening up plants or supply lines in third world countries and the brother of a prince or son-in-law of a queen gets a contract, basically a bribe, something that's prosecuted here mostly with large corporations doing things like that, but the facts do fit for news corp., if they bribed people at scotland yard to prosecute them in the u.s. >> how serious is the violation of a foreign practices act, something the sort of thing that could have more problems for a company? >> could have more problems, people could go to jail depending on how high you can show there was authorization to violate the act, but the corporation could be put into a monitorship for a period of time as we've seen with wall street companies over the years. they could actually make the company -- have the company lose its charter if they wanted to, but i'd like to move away from the criminal for a second, our federal communic
scotland. starting be inevitable referendum that would one day soon bring independence. huge, global events had happened. wanted man wast shot dead by american special forces. osama bin laden had been living in a protected mansion house one hour from islamabad. helicopters landed a group of u.s. navy seals. the al qaeda leader was killed. his body was buried at sea. the world wondered after the retaliation. >> today in particular we should remember the brave servicemen and women who have given their lives in the fight against terrorism around the world. osama bin laden was the manner responsible for 9/11, the terrific killing of americans that remains to this day the largest loss of british life in any terrorist attack. the head of a family group put it as this -- we were raised obviously never to hope for someone's death, but we are willing to make an exception in this case. he was evil personified the and we are willing to make an exception. for those that lost family members on 9/11, i am sure that my friend agrees that the sobering reality is that things are unchanged after the death of
challenge question was a, operation weeting, the code name for scotland yard's hacking investigation. scotland yard has a book called "the book," and operations are randomly assigned code names from the book. go to our website for more. thanks for being part of my program this week. i will see you next week. >>> the headline-grabbing word scandal no longer captures what's happening to rupert murdoch's empire. targets as high as the prime minister and the queen and with one of his top lieutenants arrested in london today, this is a moment of reckoning for journalism. is there really any evidence of misconduct here in the u.s.? are murdoch's critics using this crisis as an excuse to vilify him. our guests include the editor of "the guardian." how much is the press being spun by the president and the republicans. i'm howard kurtz. this is "reliable sources." >>> the murdoch media empire is in all-out damage control mode as the scandal at the british papers continues to spread on this side of the atlantic, the fbi opened a preliminary investigation on whether phone hacking
hacking scandal as james murdoch, that's the son of rue pert comes under scrutiny. scotland yard was urged to open a criminal investigation into claims the news corp executive lied if his testimony to parliament. this a day after two former news of the world executives accused the younger murdoch of getting "mistaken evidence." you may remember watson from tuesday's temperature known as the tormenter in chief. he was the one hammering away at both murdoches about exactly what they knew and when they knew it, a bone he's picked on for more than two years now. tom watson joins us from london. you say this is the most significant moment in two years of phone hacking investigations. and it all centers on an e-mail involving an exnews of the world reporter. explain. >> yes, the significance of this is the top team at news of the world and news international are fragmenting. and for the former lawyer to accuse him of lying to parliament is serious itself. if james murdoch disputes it, and if the lawyers account is accurate, it shows that james murdoch knew there was other criminal wrongdoing in
. >> absolutely. scotland yard has been embarrassed by the whole situation. scotland yard is taking a very aggressive tactic addressing rebekah brooke. they are getting involve and they not only sounded like they didn't run their newspapers, they sound like they didn't even head their newspapers. anyone who read news of the world or the sun could tell that there were hacked voice mails in there and they had no idea they didn't have the proof. >> give us perspective he was passionate about newspapers. >> sure. this was the best selling newspaper in britain a lot of people and analysts within news corp. said why don't we get rid of the non-money makers and other media venchers. murdoch is an old newspaper man and that's how we came up. he has a sentimental attachment to the papers and when it comes to this side of the atlantic where he keeps the new york post and loses a lot of money and has a lot of influence in new york and nationally, it's because it's part of his power base. that paper and other outlets provide coverage to people who she sympathetic to. not as people who are on the other
of 2002, senior police officers at scotland yard met the now-chief executive of news international and informed her of serious action, and the new investigation will no doubt uncover why no action was taken within news international. news international and every other responsible paper should be not to publish on page 25 or 27, but on page one, apologies to all individuals. >> then, here in the united states, california senator barbara boxer and west virginia senator jay rockefeller called on eric holder and the squurt and exchange commissions to see if news corp. violated u.s. law ins bribing police officials to gain access to private telephone information and records. part of their letter reads "the reported allegations against news corporation are very serious, indicating a pattern of illegal activity and involve thousands of potential victims. it's important to ensure no united states laws were broken and no united states citizens were victimized." also letters urging holder to conduct an investigation and now new york congressman peter king is calling for an fbi investigation
tweeting on this issue. he is being called in to scotland yard as part of their investigation to answer some questions. that's because he said that rebecca brooks, he said this in a tweet, rebecca brooks told him almost all the information that appeared in the tabloid was given to them by the police. he went on in a later tweet and talked about the fact that most likely the police are getting quite a bit of money for coming up with these tips. the investigation continues and is widening. in an effort to do something that is exhaustive this time they are checking every angle. george michael falls into that category. >> how are the people of london reacting to this as they see this paper and the details how it was run start to unravel? >> reporter: well, unfortunately, doesn't come as a big surprise for a lot of people here. there is a lot of mistrust. one towards politicians in this country and two towards the media. this for a lot of people just represents what they've known all along, there have been dubious practices. i don't think people here understood the extent to which reporters
kind of things happened here that happened over there. scotland yard made its ninth arrest in a widening scandal over in britain. how far will this go? joining us, u.s. senator barbara boxer from california. do you think the fbi should investigate the newscorp and rupert murdoch? >> absolutely and senator jay rockefeller, chairman of the committee of which i am a senior member, he joined me and we asked for an investigation by the department of justice and the security and exchange commission. listen, chris, there are two laws that really may be implicated here, that may have been broken here. one is the foreign corrupt practices act that passed in the '70s. one is the so-called wiretap act. and american corporations can't break american laws, and rupert murdoch, according to reports, became an american citizen. his corporation is american, because he wanted to be able to own tv stations. well, the fact is, you have to abide by american law. >> let me ask you, do you believe in he bribed foreign officials? isn't that what we're talking about? his corporation? >> well, it's
brought down rupert murdoch's "news of the world" paper. the top cop in london will testify about scotland yard's investigation today. >>> i want to be a fly on the wall during these ongoing debt talks. 20 days until the deadline on raising the debt ceiling. there's no deal yet. president obama reportedly told lawmakers, quote, this could bring my presidency down. talking about his promise to veto a short-term extension. he says he will not yield. they'll meet again today. the fifth session in as many days. the white house warns failing to raise the debt ceiling by august 2 send could trigger a partial default. >>> the power is slowly being restored in the chicago area after one of the worst storms on record. the storm packed wind gusts of nearly 80 miles an hour, knocking down trees and power lines. nearly 1 million customers were affected. this morning, the power company says more than 75% of its customers have had its power restored. >>> now the wakeup call for the shuttle "atlantis" crew. ♪ if you believed they put a man on the moon ♪ ♪ man on the moon ♪ if you believed >> good
of bskyb and in terms of "the sunday times" or scotland yard that these are going to go. how far can you cut off a disease before you kill the patients. >> let's talk about doughnuts. dunkin' donuts thought to make a big move. >> there's one dunkin' donuts for about every 10,000 people in america. >> seems like one. >> there is one in every corner. they are planning to go public. this could add some of those animal spirits back into the marketplace. this doesn't only include donuts, my friend. it includes ice cream, as well. baskin-robins is part of this. for franchisees going public is hard. you have all of that scrutiny. we are concerned about jobs there. we are concerned about where it's going to price. i lost you at donuts, i think. >> i went to dunkin' donuts university one time. here is the lesson out of that. they're learning to make the donuts. don't go on the first couple of weeks. it takes a while to learn to make the donuts. note to self in case you should go. nicole lapin, thank you so much. >>> moments ago we heard from house speaker boehner. he said that the president talks
of the metropolitan police, refer to as scotland yard, have worked for news international advising them in a pr capacity. what worked for the government. there is this kind of seedy revolving door between the police and as powerful media company. as i said, when it is calms down a little, police need to look at self-policing, especially with regard to what people do after they left. but it also seems to be an issue plane corruption. police were being bribed by journalists to provide information. that could end up, as the caller said, it has not been that big a part of the story yet. we could have police facing disciplinary hearings if not criminal prosecutions. host: do you see potential of this bringing down the camden government? guest: -- cameron government? guest: people are beginning to think that. if he had an election in six months, it would be serious. it does not look very good. the scandal last year broke a lot of trust in politicians. now you have got a prime minister who appointed someone, his former communications director, a former editor of "news of the world" when the hacking wa
's coming in. we've got the picture, we make $1 million on the newspaper. >> the top two at scotland yard are now out. this is going to lop don this week -- london this weekend to look at the olympics. in one year from now, the world is coming there and scotland yard is in tatters. >> a lot to go. >> thanks, guys. >>> coming up, somalia is becoming the next target on the war on terror. the investigative reporter for the nation, jeremy skayhill. and chief white house correspondent chuck todd. you're watching "morning joe" brewed by starbucks. my contacts are so annoying. i can't wait to take 'em out. [ male announcer ] know the feeling? try acuvue® oasys brand contact lenses with hydraclear® plus for exceptional comfort. it feels like it disappeared on my eye! [ male announcer ] discover why it's the brand eye doctors trust most for comfort. acuvue® oasys brand. [ male announcer ] get ready for the left lane. the volkswagen autobahn for all event is back. right now, get a great deal on new volkswagen models, including the cc. and every volkswagen includes scheduled carefree maintenance.
paid to scotland yard officers by "news of the world" a violation of federal anti-bribery law. so, there's -- there's multiple fronts on which this is escalating for news corp., on top of the reports today that james murdoch may have to go back before parliament. >> and, mike, is any of this touching the media properties in the united states yet of the rupert murdoch empire, or is all this still stemming from the actions done with the uk media properties? >> well, certainly the computer hacking is an allegation involving a news corp. subsidiary in the united states, so that's the jurisdictional hook there. there's a problem there because it took place seven years ago, outside the statute of limitations, but if there is a pattern of conduct that could be established here, that would be the basis by which the feds could bring charges. but, you know, it's early yet. we got to be cautious. >> all right, mike isikoff, our national investigative correspondent, mike, thanks very much. >> thank you. >>> all right, once every decade, i've been promising you this for days, states redraw the
at london's scotland yard. called before plig politicians answer accusations of systemic incompetence and their answers are telling. >> we know that, there always will be. >> reporter: so who did take bribes? among those questioned, former police officer andy hayman who now writes for "news international." ironic that he led a criticized investigation against the company for phone hacking in 2006. >> while a police officer, did you ever receive payment from any news -- >> good god! absolutely not. i can't believe you suggested that. >> lots of people -- >> come on. absolutely no way. i can say to you -- >> mr. hayman -- >> no, come on, chairman, that's not fair. >> the police woman leading the current investigation into news international phone hacking says the reputation of the entire metropolitan police force is now on the line. >> i think it's everybody's analysis that confidence has been damaged, and i don't -- and i don't doubt if we don't get this right, it will continue to be damaged. >> let's try to get a sense of where this is going. with us the chief washington columnist and
scotland yard's links to the paper stop police probing the phone- hacking scandal more deeply. full disclosure is embarrassing too for the prime minister. a list of engagements released by downing street today show just how frequently he paid court to news corp. executives and they to him. the prime minister won't be saying sorry for that, but rupert murdoch will be apologizing again this weekend for what he called serious wrongdoing at the "news of the world." he's personally signed a letter, which will run as an advert in seven national newspapers so his later in the day, a second top murdoch executive resigned. since 2007, les hinton has been c.e.o. at dow jones and company, publisher of the "wall street journal." but for 12 years, he chaired the company that oversaw the british tabloids now involved in the scandal. he said in a statement today he was ignorant of what apparently happened, but felt it proper to resign. for more on that part of the story, i'm joined now by rem reider of "american journalism review." thanks for being with us. >> my pleasure. >> so tell us a little b
have been arrested. i've been invited to scotland yard to be arrested three times. they were still saying we didn't know. it was just reporters actsing on their own. >> rupert murdoch and his son james have agreed to testify tuesday at a parliamentary hearing on the scandal. >>> she was tried, she was acquitted, and now she's about to be set free. casey anthony's murder trial captivated much of the nation. the verdicts outraged many -- the verdict outraged many. as of midnight she's eligible to be set free from the orange county, florida, jail. we don't know exactly when or how the release will happen. there are some concerns about anthony's safety once she is released. but the sheriff says he's not aware of 95 credible threats to her life. i want you to take a look -- >>> i want you to look at this freight train derailment outside minneapolis, st. paul. the train went off the tracks near a bridge that had been washed out by recent heavy rains. investigators are clearing the 17 derailed cars. service has been suspended, including to tonight's minnesota twins game. >>> the president
scotland yard guys whose names are, which is never going to happen, but i hope everybody vows to themselves and to their staffs, if they're editors, that we're going to put out a paper without stooping into the gutter. we're not going into the gutter. we're an instrument for helping people up, not to take the whole standards of our profession and lower them, that we end up saying that great men, giants preceded us, and those other ones that died for this profession should not be ashamed of using the name, using the thing, the word newspaper man or newspaper woman or journalist. that's something we ought to wear like a badge of honor. >> pete hamill, thanks so much for being here. >> thank you. >> next up, the african famine threatening the lives of millions, particularly children. it is the worst it has been in decades, and importantly, this may be a sign of things to come. food shortages in places you would never expect. [ male announcer ] introducing the ultimate business phone -- t the motorola expert from sprint. its powerful tools help you work faster and smarter so you can get back to
were bought and sold. scotland yard claims that people were trying to wreck the current inquiry by leaking allegations the news of the world tried to get some numbers to members of the royal family by blaming police officers. -- bribing police officers. >> once again the ethics that should underpin the relationship between the police and journalists is under scrutiny. police the publicity to help them investigate. but a slew of allegations shows the darker side. >> any journalist trying to persuade police officers to impart sensitive information. that is what the stories are all about. there is a line that cannot be crossed. a member of the royal protection squad has allegedly passed on information and exchange for cash. another profound shock. personal protection officers travel and the same cars as the royals. others are in back of the vehicles. here in the silver van. others guard buildings. the bbc was told that "news of editor was asked for a thousand pounds to be paid to a royal protection officer. the police officer had stolen a confidential directory containing phone num
-ranking officers of scotland yard part of the original investigation in to news of the world were themselves victims of hacking. the allegations raising new questions about their handling of the case and they feared reprisals from the paper. the officers will appear at a hearing on that today. >>> wow. so have we heard -- have we heard any response from murdock's people? about these are overblown, they're not true? because you know what, again we've seen before where things are swept up. >> absolutely. especially in london. >> it's a storm, the london tabloids. and you sit there and go, i wonder if this is much to do about nothing down the road. but for the fact that i'm not really hearing a response from news corp. they're usually the most aggressive pitbulls. i mean, i always -- you look at their pr staff, they're remarkable. you sit there in wonderment. but they're completely silent. i'm thinking, wow, where there's smoke, there might be a lot of fire. >> they responded this morning to great britain. they responded by obviously the closure of the -- >> yeah, obviously. >> they responded.
family are gathering for another royal wedding, tomorrow in scotland. hop on that flight. >> join that, cbs news royal contributor victoria arbiter. nice to have you back. >> good morning, good to be here. >> zara philips, where does she figure into the royal lineage? >> the queen's oldest granddaughter, 13th to the throne, daughter of princess anne and first husband captain mark phillips and very accomplished equestrian, hoping to compete in london, physical therapist, has her own fashion line for sportswear, accomplished young lady. >> very modern young princess. >> the guy is mike tindell, captain of the england rugby team. >> looks very rugby. >> broken his nose nine times. they were introduced by prince harry in 2003. she's not an official princess. they are down-to-earth modern monarchy. >> she's 13th in line so a lot has to happen. i'm kidding. what type of wedding will it be? we saw the pomp and circumstance with will and kate's wedding? will it be any of the same? >> no, not a tiara to be seen. expecting 300 guests. it is in edinburgh. security is intense and there's no room.
session hours after another high profile member of scotland yard announced his resignation. several of the british papers reporters are accused of hacking into private cellphone accounts and bribing police officers for information. the newspaper was owned by news corp., the parent company of fox news. senior foreign affairs correspondent amy kellogg is live in london. what do we know today, amy. >> reporter: the phone hacking case is not just touching the top etc etchelon, but the police force. britain's two top cops resigning, the latest casualty john yates who was the assistant police commissioner, this resignation coming on the heels of the resignation of the commissioner himself yesterday amidst allegations that the original phone hacking investigation back in 2009 wasn't handled thoroughly or properly among other issues, and the police complaints commission has received four referrals about the conduct of different senior police officials in connection with this case. then rebecca brooks, until recently the head of rupert murdoch's british newspaper group arrested yesterday in
, working with its counterparts from scotland yard and the other authorities is basically monitoring their investigation to see whether or not news corp itself was involved in the allegations of the bribery. the fact that you have subsidiary companies of news corp doesn't necessarily mean that the executives themselves in fluz corp knew that this hacking was going on in london. >> other officials or a subsidiary of news corporation, that would be a skriem in tcrim sgliets. >> not necessarily. if those subsidiary companies are based in the uk, they're not going to necessarily be subject to the jurisdiction of the united states. news corp is traded on nasdaq so it's considered a u.s. corporation. if they were involved and knowledgeable of bribery of public officials in the uk, then that would be in violation of the foreign corrupt practices act. that's a felony that could be prosecuted here in the united states for that. >> very quickly because we've got to go, but you sort of wish you were still in the fbi to be investigating this kind of case? or would you just as soon let someone el
, and that obviously is going to include some of the cooperation with scotland yard to track down the source of the story and run it into the ground and see where it goes from there. >> susan, thank you. >>> the debt ceiling debate. is raising taxes a way to a deal? transitions adapt to changing light so you see a whole day comfortably and conveniently while protecting your eyes from the sun. ask your eyecare professional which transitions lenses are right for you. female announcer: thanks to the eyeglass guide, it's never been easier to find the right pair of eyeglasses. check out eyeglassguide.com today, brought to you by transitions. on every surface in your mouth. but did you know those same germs can build up and form a resilient layer called biofilm? biofilm germs are strong enough to survive daily brushing. thankfully, there's listerine® antiseptic. its triple-action formula goes deep to penetrate biofilm, kill germs and protect your mouth for up to 12 hours. aaaahhhh... [ male announcer ] for a deeper clean, fight biofilm with listerine®. [ male announcer ] you don't makeby pressin
people have been arrested but it may not end there. scotland yard believes the investigation will continue to grow and along with it the pressure on rupert murdoch's media empire. >> that was stephanie gosk. >> the real story there and willie touched on it, hugh grant has looked the same for 20 years. before knotting hill -- >> doesn't get work done. >> there was -- he did "about a boy", i like that one but he got old there then he got young again. i don't know how that happens. he's looking good. isn't that the story, the best analysis you've heard this morning. >> i would like to follow up with simon. >> you know who else hasn't aged? >> who? >> i remember watching him and it was in '63, the beatles still a year away but simon hobbs known as the ed sullivan of great britain, he hasn't aged a year. >> it's extraordinary, it's in the british genes. good morning. you know the germans have a word, it's called -- >> what are you upset about today? >> the germans have a word it's taking place here at other people's misfortune. in business terms, you know, you cut through really w
states and australia and new zealand and another one from scotland, right? yes, amazing. matthew, you were sleeping, because you got here very early this morning and you were awake for the launch thank goodness, and when you saw it what adjective described it best? >> awesome. >> reporter: i knew that word was coming to mind. are you glad to be part of history? >> yes. >> reporter: and did you ever have dreams of becoming an astronaut? >> yes. >> reporter: do you think that it will still be possible even though this is the last shuttle launch? >> yep. >> reporter: you do. and i will ask your mom that very question, because it was exciting for you, too. >> oh, yeah, it was awesome. >> reporter: and some people think it is the end of the space program, even though other programs on tap, it will be quite some time and maybe not within his lifetime that we will see someone on board something like a space shuttle. what do you think? >> i just hope they continue to go farther ininto space, and keep going, and maybe one day he will be part of it or maybe his kids. >> reporter: do you think t
's a reality, isn't it? it's reality, if you look at it. they figured out how to wire scotland yard and parliament and 10 downing street. rupert murdock has been for some time, the most powerful man in britain. >> when you see this frail man yesterday objectly incapable of following the facts, unable to remember the names and certain facts, well, i'm afraid there was something on the part of journalists. they know him to be aggressive, particular, specific. remember, i was mentioning earlier in piers morgan's diaries, he worked for rupert murdock for 18 months and he rang him every week of every month for 18 months. >> martin -- >> yes he says he knew nothing. >> are you surprised more questions haven't been raised about the passage from peer morgan's book where he talks about phone hacking and brags about how you can do it? >> no, i'm not surprised. he doesn't say he does it. what he says in the book, if you read it carefully, this is important. he said, he heard about this phenomena and he therefore personally changed his own cell phone numbers in order to prevent that from happen
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 52 (some duplicates have been removed)